Pharmacies played a key role in the Civil Rights – Why is that important?

The NAACP Youth Council sit-in at Katz Drug Store in Oklahoma City in 1958. From the John Melton Collection.

By Greg Bond from the Points History Blog:

On August 6, 1894, Abraham D. Cecil, an African American painter and interior decorator from Bloomington, Illinois, visited the drugstore of Hamer H. Green and ordered a glass of cherry phosphate soda. Green, the former President of the Illinois State Board of Pharmacy, drew the color line and refused to serve his African American customer.

Abraham Cecil was not alone. Beginning in the late nineteenth century, drugstores and pharmacies were frequently sites of civil rights activism as African Americans protested the color line and fought against unequal treatment. Particularly as drugstore soda fountains and lunch counters became common throughout the country, African Americans repeatedly turned to the courts or engaged in direct actions like sit-ins, pickets, and boycotts to challenge Jim Crow in the drugstore.

Read the rest of the article at the Points History Blog.



Categories: African American History, United States History

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