The Consequences of Yellow Journalism

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William Randolph Hearst

Yellow journalism was a style of newspaper reporting that emphasized sensationalism over facts. During its heyday in the late 19th century, it was one of many factors that helped push the United States and Spain into war in Cuba and the Philippines, leading to the acquisition of overseas territory by the United States. The jingoistic journalism of publishers like William Randolph Hearst directly contributed to the United States starting the Spanish American War in 1898.

Yellow Journalism named after a cartoon

The term originated in the competition over the New York City newspaper market between major newspaper publishers Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. At first, yellow journalism had nothing to do with reporting, but instead derived from a popular cartoon strip about the life in New York’s slums called Hogan’s Alley, drawn by Richard F. Outcault. Published in color by Pulitzer’s New York World, the comic’s most well-known character came to be known as the Yellow Kid, and his popularity accounted in no small part for a tremendous increase in sales of the World.

Read the rest of the article on Yellow Journalism at DailyHistory.org 

 



Categories: United States History

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