Month: March 2018

Five myths about espionage

From The Washington Post by Mark Kramer: The poisoning of former Russian military intelligence officer Sergei Skripal and his daughter in southern England, most likely by Russian intelligence agents, highlights the role of espionage in Russia’s relations with the West. Skripal had… Read More ›

When did oil paints become popular?

While the dating of oil paint’s origins are still under scrutiny, the technique of oil painting became widely popular during the fifteenth century. The medium, which revolutionized painting, supplanted the previously popular medium of tempera paint and afforded artists with… Read More ›

How did Monotheism Develop?

While monotheism is seen as something that has derived from Judaism, the history of how monotheism became pervasive is complex. Integrating both historical and archaeological data, we find that the rise of monotheism has been influenced by key political events…. Read More ›

The Fighting Roosevelts

From Werehistory.org by Todd Arrington: In all of American history, millions of men and women have served in the nation’s armed forces. Of those many millions, only 3,517 have received the nation’s highest award for military valor: the Medal of… Read More ›

Margaret Sanger in Japan

From Stanford University Press Blog by Aiko Takeuchi-Demirci author Contraceptive Democracy: Reproduction Politics and Imperial Ambitions in the United States and Japan: Margaret Sanger’s first visit to Japan in 1922 stirred public hype in Japan. Comparing it to the “black… Read More ›

History, Memory, and the Power of Black Radio

From Black Perspectives by Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders: Between 1948 and 1950, a radio series called Destination Freedom aired on WMAQ, a local Chicago NBC station. Richard Durham created Destination Freedom in an attempt to profile significant African American historical figures and their contributions to American democracy and… Read More ›